Green Eggs and Ham Chinese Style

I would eat them in a car, or at a bar, or on the way to a star . . . Of course, I am talking about century eggs! But I am getting Seussy because this recipe pairs the pidan with a savory, delicious pork congee. So, indeed, this is Green Eggs and Ham – Chinese Style. For more about this delicious dish and about congee in general, check out my article in today’s issue of Zester Daily.

Pork Congee with Century Eggs

Eggs with Shrimp and Pidan

One of the agreeable and delicious ways to enjoy pidan is with eggs. Some recipes use pidan along with salted eggs or salted egg yolks with or without fresh chicken or duck eggs to make custards or other egg dishes. This recipe, however, couples pidan with regular chicken or duck eggs and a bit of shrimp and spring onions for a tasty and mild dish. The set scrambled eggs or omelet made here is finished by slicing it into thin strips and eating the eggs along with rice or noodles as part of a light or multi-course meal.

Eggs with Shrimp and Pidan
Eggs with Shrimp and Pidan (unsliced)

It can be served with a variety of condiments, from soy sauce to chili oil, pickled ginger, or roasted sesame seeds to allow diners to customize the flavor of the dish to their liking. It also makes a great breakfast or brunch dish that will satisfy a wide variety of family and friends.

Eggs with Shrimp and Pidan

Ingredients
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
5 -7 medium shrimp, shelled, deveined, and minced
5 chicken or duck eggs
¼ -½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper (white or black)
3 spring onions, minced
1 1000-Year Egg, peeled, rinsed, and coarsely diced

Method
Beat eggs until frothy and beginning to lighten in color. Add salt and pepper, and beat again until well mixed. Add about half of the spring onion pieces and mix in well.

Heat oil in a sauté pan; add shrimp and sauté for one minute. Then remove and set aside in a small bowl.

Reheat sauté pan over medium heat, add beaten egg mixture and when it begins to harden, add the shrimp and the 1000-year eggs. At this point one can scramble the eggs lightly and then let them set into a single solid mass, or one can cook the eggs more like an omelet. If using the omelet method, use a fork or small spatula to pull the eggs away from the side of the pan and then tilt the pan to let the raw egg flow into the gap made with the spatula. Continue until most of the eggs have set. If desired, place under a preheated broiler for a few minutes to firm up the eggs in the center of the pan.

When done remove from heat and loosen the eggs from the pan with a small spatula. When loose, turn out onto a serving plate and garnish with the remaining spring onions. Cut into thin strips and serve with rice and condiments such as soy sauce, chili oil, pickled ginger, and roasted sesame seeds.
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For those of you curious about 1000-Year Eggs, but still a bit wary, this dish is for you, because the shrimp and eggs complement the pidan nicely and make the flavor of the eggs very mild. (Words and photo by Laura Kelley).

Sliced Peppers with Century Eggs

This is another appetizer or salad presentation of 1000-year eggs. One of the interesting things about this dish is that it can be served hot with the peppers and other vegetables fresh from the wok. Alternatively, you can let it cool for 10-15 minutes for a dish that is only slightly warm. I don’t recommend letting it sit too long though, for risk of the dressing overpowering the rest of the ingredients.

Sliced Peppers with Century Eggs
Sliced Peppers with Century Eggs

The other interesting thing is that is uses cilantro for flavor instead of spring onions which gives it a lighter, brighter flavor that works very well with both the bell peppers and the pidan.

Although the ingredients for the dressing are similar to those used in the Cold Tofu with Pidan dish, the proportions are different. Here the black vinegar figures more prominently because there is more of it and it is not complemented by sugar, except that from the vegetables themselves. There is also less soy sauce so, once again the herbs and vegetables shine brightly, and without too much salt.

If you are one of those folks who don’t like cilantro, feel free to use spring onions instead. But, I caution you that you are missing out on a great set of flavors here, and one that is a bit unusual as Chinese dishes go.

The Century eggs themselves provide a savory base to the dish and also lend a pungent bite of flavor when you get a piece of a yolk in a mouthful.

Sliced Peppers with Century Eggs

Ingredients
Salad
2, 1000-year eggs
1 small-to-medium bunch of cilantro, minced
2 teaspoons peanut or sunflower-seed oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 green bell pepper, sliced
1 half red bell pepper, sliced
1 red chili pepper, minced (optional, but good)

Dressing
2 teaspoons light soy sauce
2 teaspoons black vinegar
1 teaspoon sesame oil
2 -3 teaspoons sesame seeds, lightly roasted

Method
Place a thin layer of minced cilantro at the bottom of the serving bowl or plate to provide a surface for the eggs to sit on so that they don’t slide around after the dressing is poured. Cut each egg into four or six or eight slices and put in serving plate or bowl. Place the rest of the minced cilantro on top of the eggs – reserving just enough to garnish the finished dish.

In a small cup or bowl mix the ingredients for the dressing together until well blended.

Heat the oil in a wok and stir fry the minced garlic for about 1 minute. Add the sliced peppers, cover and cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring frequently until the peppers begin to soften.

Place the cooked peppers on top of the cilantro and eggs. Pour in soy sauce, vinegar, and sesame oil, garnish with remaining cilantro and the roasted sesame seeds and serve.

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Again, stay tuned here for more ways to make Century eggs. I’m going to try to post a new recipe every day or two, before moving on to other Silk Road topics. (Words, recipe and photos by Laura Kelley).

Cold Tofu with Pidan

One of my favorite ways to enjoy 1000-year eggs is as part of a cold-tofu salad.  This presentation of pidan is enjoyed all over China this way as well as in Taiwan, Japan and Korea.  It is served as an appetizer or as part of a meal with many dishes eaten at the same time.  For western cooks, it is simple to make, exotic, nutritious (full of protein) and welcomes an endless array of variations to suit almost any taste.  It also works well as a snack or a light meal

The secret to this fabulous dish is in the dressing.  It is salty, savory, sour and a bit sweet all at the same time.

Cold Tofu with Pidan
Cold Tofu with Pidan

It can be served as a mixed melee as I have done in the photo above, or it can be served Japanese style, like a hiyayakko, where each ingredient is placed separately on a platter and diners can pick only those ingredients that they want.

Cold Tofu with Pidan

Ingredients
Salad
8-10 ounces of silken tofu
2 1000-year eggs
1-2 tablespoons shredded bonito
1 large spring onion, minced
1/3 cucumber, peeled and minced (or cut into a small dice)
1 clove garlic, minced
1 inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced
1 red chili pepper (optional, but good)

Dressing
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon black vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar (I use demerara)
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Method
Place the tofu in a serving dish or bowl and slice into cubes; keep the cubes together in a single unit.  Quarter one of the 1000-year eggs and place around the base of the tofu.  Roughly chop the second pidan and set aside.  Place shredded bonito on top of the tofu, then place the roughly chopped pidan on top of the bonito.

In a small bowl mix together the spring onion, cucumber, garlic, ginger and chili pepper.  When well mixed, place on top of the tofu and other ingredients.  In a small cup or bowl combine the ingredients for the dressing and mix until blended. Pour dressing over tofu and serve immediately.

Variations:  This dish is really flexible and can be easily changed to suit your tastes.  You can substitute pork floss for bonito, or omit the meat flavors altogether for a dish more suitable for vegetarians.  If you enjoy the flavor wallop of Chinese pickled mustard, add a tablespoon to the vegetable mix. If you don’t like the sometimes overpowering flavor of sesame oil – use less, or omit completely.  If you prefer it more sour use only black vinegar.

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Over the next week or two, I hope to post a bunch of recipes for pidan from around Asia. Check back soon for more great food! (Words, recipe, and photos by Laura Kelley).