Eggs with Shrimp and Pidan

One of the agreeable and delicious ways to enjoy pidan is with eggs. Some recipes use pidan along with salted eggs or salted egg yolks with or without fresh chicken or duck eggs to make custards or other egg dishes. This recipe, however, couples pidan with regular chicken or duck eggs and a bit of shrimp and spring onions for a tasty and mild dish. The set scrambled eggs or omelet made here is finished by slicing it into thin strips and eating the eggs along with rice or noodles as part of a light or multi-course meal.

Eggs with Shrimp and Pidan

Eggs with Shrimp and Pidan (unsliced)

It can be served with a variety of condiments, from soy sauce to chili oil, pickled ginger, or roasted sesame seeds to allow diners to customize the flavor of the dish to their liking. It also makes a great breakfast or brunch dish that will satisfy a wide variety of family and friends.

Eggs with Shrimp and Pidan

Ingredients
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
5 -7 medium shrimp, shelled, deveined, and minced
5 chicken or duck eggs
¼ -½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper (white or black)
3 spring onions, minced
1 1000-Year Egg, peeled, rinsed, and coarsely diced

Method
Beat eggs until frothy and beginning to lighten in color. Add salt and pepper, and beat again until well mixed. Add about half of the spring onion pieces and mix in well.

Heat oil in a sauté pan; add shrimp and sauté for one minute. Then remove and set aside in a small bowl.

Reheat sauté pan over medium heat, add beaten egg mixture and when it begins to harden, add the shrimp and the 1000-year eggs. At this point one can scramble the eggs lightly and then let them set into a single solid mass, or one can cook the eggs more like an omelet. If using the omelet method, use a fork or small spatula to pull the eggs away from the side of the pan and then tilt the pan to let the raw egg flow into the gap made with the spatula. Continue until most of the eggs have set. If desired, place under a preheated broiler for a few minutes to firm up the eggs in the center of the pan.

When done remove from heat and loosen the eggs from the pan with a small spatula. When loose, turn out onto a serving plate and garnish with the remaining spring onions. Cut into thin strips and serve with rice and condiments such as soy sauce, chili oil, pickled ginger, and roasted sesame seeds.
_____

For those of you curious about 1000-Year Eggs, but still a bit wary, this dish is for you, because the shrimp and eggs complement the pidan nicely and make the flavor of the eggs very mild. (Words and photo by Laura Kelley).

Share

Sliced Peppers with Century Eggs

This is another appetizer or salad presentation of 1000-year eggs. One of the interesting things about this dish is that it can be served hot with the peppers and other vegetables fresh from the wok. Alternatively, you can let it cool for 10-15 minutes for a dish that is only slightly warm. I don’t recommend letting it sit too long though, for risk of the dressing overpowering the rest of the ingredients.

Sliced Peppers with Century Eggs

Sliced Peppers with Century Eggs

The other interesting thing is that is uses cilantro for flavor instead of spring onions which gives it a lighter, brighter flavor that works very well with both the bell peppers and the pidan.

Although the ingredients for the dressing are similar to those used in the Cold Tofu with Pidan dish, the proportions are different. Here the black vinegar figures more prominently because there is more of it and it is not complemented by sugar, except that from the vegetables themselves. There is also less soy sauce so, once again the herbs and vegetables shine brightly, and without too much salt.

If you are one of those folks who don’t like cilantro, feel free to use spring onions instead. But, I caution you that you are missing out on a great set of flavors here, and one that is a bit unusual as Chinese dishes go.

The Century eggs themselves provide a savory base to the dish and also lend a pungent bite of flavor when you get a piece of a yolk in a mouthful.

Sliced Peppers with Century Eggs

Ingredients
Salad
2, 1000-year eggs
1 small-to-medium bunch of cilantro, minced
2 teaspoons peanut or sunflower-seed oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 green bell pepper, sliced
1 half red bell pepper, sliced
1 red chili pepper, minced (optional, but good)

Dressing
2 teaspoons light soy sauce
2 teaspoons black vinegar
1 teaspoon sesame oil
2 -3 teaspoons sesame seeds, lightly roasted

Method
Place a thin layer of minced cilantro at the bottom of the serving bowl or plate to provide a surface for the eggs to sit on so that they don’t slide around after the dressing is poured. Cut each egg into four or six or eight slices and put in serving plate or bowl. Place the rest of the minced cilantro on top of the eggs – reserving just enough to garnish the finished dish.

In a small cup or bowl mix the ingredients for the dressing together until well blended.

Heat the oil in a wok and stir fry the minced garlic for about 1 minute. Add the sliced peppers, cover and cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring frequently until the peppers begin to soften.

Place the cooked peppers on top of the cilantro and eggs. Pour in soy sauce, vinegar, and sesame oil, garnish with remaining cilantro and the roasted sesame seeds and serve.

_____

Again, stay tuned here for more ways to make Century eggs. I’m going to try to post a new recipe every day or two, before moving on to other Silk Road topics. (Words, recipe and photos by Laura Kelley).

Share

Cold Tofu with Pidan

One of my favorite ways to enjoy 1000-year eggs is as part of a cold-tofu salad.  This presentation of pidan is enjoyed all over China this way as well as in Taiwan, Japan and Korea.  It is served as an appetizer or as part of a meal with many dishes eaten at the same time.  For western cooks, it is simple to make, exotic, nutritious (full of protein) and welcomes an endless array of variations to suit almost any taste.  It also works well as a snack or a light meal

The secret to this fabulous dish is in the dressing.  It is salty, savory, sour and a bit sweet all at the same time.

Cold Tofu with Pidan

Cold Tofu with Pidan

It can be served as a mixed melee as I have done in the photo above, or it can be served Japanese style, like a hiyayakko, where each ingredient is placed separately on a platter and diners can pick only those ingredients that they want.

Cold Tofu with Pidan

Ingredients
Salad
8-10 ounces of silken tofu
2 1000-year eggs
1-2 tablespoons shredded bonito
1 large spring onion, minced
1/3 cucumber, peeled and minced (or cut into a small dice)
1 clove garlic, minced
1 inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced
1 red chili pepper (optional, but good)

Dressing
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon black vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar (I use demerara)
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Method
Place the tofu in a serving dish or bowl and slice into cubes; keep the cubes together in a single unit.  Quarter one of the 1000-year eggs and place around the base of the tofu.  Roughly chop the second pidan and set aside.  Place shredded bonito on top of the tofu, then place the roughly chopped pidan on top of the bonito.

In a small bowl mix together the spring onion, cucumber, garlic, ginger and chili pepper.  When well mixed, place on top of the tofu and other ingredients.  In a small cup or bowl combine the ingredients for the dressing and mix until blended. Pour dressing over tofu and serve immediately.

Variations:  This dish is really flexible and can be easily changed to suit your tastes.  You can substitute pork floss for bonito, or omit the meat flavors altogether for a dish more suitable for vegetarians.  If you enjoy the flavor wallop of Chinese pickled mustard, add a tablespoon to the vegetable mix. If you don’t like the sometimes overpowering flavor of sesame oil – use less, or omit completely.  If you prefer it more sour use only black vinegar.

_____

Over the next week or two, I hope to post a bunch of recipes for pidan from around Asia. Check back soon for more great food! (Words, recipe, and photos by Laura Kelley).

Share

Cool as Cucumber Kimchi

With temperatures warming up again and summer on its way.  Cucumber kimchi is a wonderful, light recipe for picnics, snacks and light meals.  Easy to make, unlike many kimchi recipes, cucumbers can be enjoyed right after preparation, or it can be allowed to ferment for a short period before eating it.  Read To learn more about kimchi, and also find a great recipe for cucumber kimchi, click HERE for my recent article in Zester Daily.

Zester - Kimchi

 

Share

Homemade 1000-Year Eggs Unveiled

We harvested the 1000-year eggs and are finally getting around to preparing and eating some of the crop.  The color is right, and a few of them have the pine-patterning that their CHinese name suggests on their dark, amber-colored flesh.  They taste good, but are MUCH milder than some of the Pidan I’ve had in China.  They are also missing the strong ammonia-like scent that accompanies some commercial century eggs I’ve had.

For those of you who are just tuning in to this culinary adventure of mine, check out this post to see how the eggs were transformed.  This is how they looked the morning I harvested them:

Freshly Harvest 1000-Year Eggs

Freshly Harvest 1000-Year Eggs

They didn’t look particularly appetizing at this stage.  But swim on, I told myself, the results will be worth it.  I cleaned them using a bit of water and some elbow grease, but I had to be very gentle so as to not crack the shells.  The shells are rather delicate by the end of the process, because they have been permeated by the chemical brew of tea, salt, ash and lime.

Closeup of Freshly Harvested Eggs

Closeup of Freshly Harvested Eggs

Some of the shells had a bluish tinge to them and some of them were a mottled off-white as shown above.  When the first crack revealed a solid amber flesh, I was overjoyed!  All of the eggs were transformed, but some were a bit runny in their forest-green centers.  After cleaning, I let them dry completely and then placed them in the refrigerator until I could prepare them.  I was very pleased with the results:

1000-Year Eggs with Pickled Ginger and Soy

1000-Year Eggs with Pickled Ginger and Soy

This is one of the most common ways to serve them – simply as a snack, or appetizer, or part of a large collection of dishes that might also include pickled diakon radish and pickled carrots, some sliced abalone or some and barbequed pork.  The presentation pictured here is most like the Cantonese way of eating the eggs – simply wrapped in slices of pickled ginger.  Elsewhere around China and Taiwan people enjoy them with tofu or as a flavoring to omelets made with fresh eggs.

My eggs were creamy but still a bit sharp, sort of like the sharpness of a very pungent cheese.  So don’t blindly believe all of the macho videos out there that show nervous boys choking them down.  The flavor is strong, but enjoyable.  In the preparation I made, the ginger works nicely to modulate the flavor of the eggs, and the soy dipping sauce is completely optional in my personal opinion.

Other ways to prepare them that I am set to explore soon include using them to flavor a congee (rice porridge) along with bits of pork (皮蛋瘦肉粥), and perhaps one of the recipes with chilled tofu – so stay tuned for more 1000-year eggs. (All words and photos by Laura Kelley.)

Share

Pomegranate Symbolism for Spring

Pomegranates have been used as symbols to conjure everything from lust and sexual abandon, to fertility and prosperity, to blood and national identity, and even, as in Persephone’s case, death and rebirth. Pomegranates have been with us since the beginnings of civilization and their image has meanings that span the entirety of human existence. Read more about pomegranates on Zester Daily – HERE.

Pomegranate Spring

Share

A Review of the Viking Cookbook, An Early Meal

An Early Meal by Serra and Tunberg

An Early Meal by Serra and Tunberg

Raiders… conquerors… fierce in battle and strong in family. These are the images that the world has of Vikings. We know where they lived, and to some degree how they made a living. We know which gods they worshipped and how. Yet the bulk of our knowledge consists of broad brush strokes that omit the nuances of everyday life. The Vikings recorded many things, from The Sagas to business transactions and personal letters. But beyond a brief and occasional mention, two of the many things they didn’t write about were what they ate and how they prepared their meals. The Vikings left no recipes.

Read the rest of my review of the Viking cookbook, An Early Meal on the EXARC (Experimental Archaeology) website.

Share

Listen to Laura on Taste of the Past

Listen to an interview with me on Heritage Radio’s Taste of the Past about spring rhubarb and some historical and modern Silk Road food topics. Also included is a discussion about foods, like rhubarb, that started out as medicines. Linda Cook Palaccio hosts the discussion.

Share

The Silk Road History of Rhubarb in Zester Daily

Everything you wanted to know about rhubarb’s Silk Road history, from its origins in Tibet and early use as medicine to its adoption as a food, in Zester Daily. A great recipe for savory lamb and rhubarb stew included! Read all about it HERE.

Screen Shot 2014-03-19 at 11.40.57 AM

Share

Areni Winemaking – Ancient and Modern

Last year I had the pleasure of visiting the Areni-1 cave in southern Armenia.  Many unique and noteworthy artifacts have been found in the cave, including leather shoes; fine linen fabric, woven reed mats, and pottery vessels of different styles and periods.  In addition, preserved within the cave is also the site of the world’s oldest known winery.  When the archaeologists studying the site announced this in 2012, I knew I just had to see it for myself.

Mouth of cave Areni-1

Mouth of cave Areni-1

The cave is situated overlooking a winding road that slips through a valley along the edge of the Arpa River.  Small cafes and vendors dot the roadside.  We pulled into one of the cafes that had grapevine canopies over tables that straddled side branches of the river.  I thought we were just stopping for lunch, but when I looked up, we were also right at the base of the cliff where the Areni-1 cave was located.

The earthen path to the cave was well worn, but very steep and without steps or rail, so it was a bit of a trudge get to the mouth of the cave.  It was also a hot, late spring day, and the sun, although welcome after several days of clouds and showers, beat down on us as we climbed. As we neared the mouth of the cave, a dog ran by us at breakneck speed, making me wish for a few less years on my own personal pedometer.

The view into the valley from the cave mouth is spectacular.  The hills across the access road are low and one can see for many miles to the north.  Presuming a similar lay of the land in the recent past, the cave would have provided excellent protection for occupants and as well as the ability to see animals or people headed their way at a distance.  It was the ultimate early room with a view.

Areni-1 Main Occupation Area

Areni-1 Main Occupation Area

Just to the left of the cave mouth is the main occupation area. Although the cave was inhabited on and off from the Neolithic to the late Middles Ages, the bulk of the habitation was in the Chalcolithic or Copper Age in the late 5th to early 4th millennium BCE. This area has yielded hearths, grindstones, clay storage bins, and numerous goat and sheep bones (mostly goat). In addition to their provenance, the bones themselves show signs of processing for harvesting meat and marrow as well as cooking, indicating that cave occupants were eating animals on site and probably living in proximity to them as well. Areni’s famous leather shoes were found in this area. Also found here were obsidian and chert tools. The obsidian is interesting because there are no deposits of it in the Arpa valley within 20 kilometers of the cave, indicating that cave inhabitants were either getting it themselves at a greater distance, or trading with others who had ready access to the material.

When I was in college I worked for a summer at the Tautavel caves in southern France.  The material used for some of the tools at that Neanderthal site came from several hundred miles away.  So trade at a distance for Areni’s much more modern inhabitants is no surprise. It is important to remember, however, when considering the flow of information, such as that concerning the domestication of plants or ways of processing them for food and drink, or for the ability to trade wine, say for obsidian, perhaps?

Although the cave has electricity, the day we visited, it was out. In fact, we were told it was on before our climb, but it seemed to fail especially for our visit. I don’t know how many of you are spelunkers, but as you enter a cave, the light falls off rapidly. Just a handful of feet inside the mouth of the cave and we were in near darkness that became pitch as we made our way deeper inside. Someone had a half-dead flashlight with them, and that was the only light we had to guide us. The photos in this post are a credit to my trusty Nikon and its ability capture and amplify light, because it was impossible to see a few inches beyond the weak torchlight with the unaided eye.

Areni-1 Wine Production Area

Areni-1 Wine Production Area

To the left, in the darkness of the cave, was the main wine processing area. This area has a shallow clay tub, the center of which is occupied by the mouth of a large jar. Archaeologists think that this basin was for the pressing of grapes or berries, and that the pressed juice flowed into the mouth of the large jar. This interpretation is bolstered by the discovery of desiccated grapes, grape seeds and skins still attached to pedicels, and even grape stems in close proximity to these jars. Morphological examination of the Copper-Age grape remains found here suggest that they are an intermediary between wild and domestic fruits, so it is possible that grape domestication was in process at Areni-1. The presence of large storage jars around the pressing installation may even indicate that secondary fermentation took place there. Plastering of jar mouths would have created an airlock, protecting the wine from oxidation. Carbon-14 dating of the grapes in this area places them between 4223 – 3790 BCE, making this the oldest wine-producing assemblage yet discovered. There are older jars with sediments that have been identified as wine known from Georgia and Iran, which indicates the consumption of wine in those places, but Armenia has the claim as oldest site for wine making.

In addition to grapes, the remains of many other fruits, drupes, and nuts were found in the cave, including plums, pears, hackberries, silverberries, almonds and walnuts. These could have been for consumption as food items, or some of them (notably plums and pears) could have been used in the production of mixed-fruit wines. The presence of the walnuts are also notable because there is very little data on when humans started to domesticate (purposely plant and harvest nuts) from these trees. Areni-1 offers remains and a firm range of dates when inhabitants were eating these in the Caucasus. Charred grains such as emmer, early wheat (Triticum cf. aestivum), naked and hulled barley, lentils, and grass peas were also found in the cave.

Areni-1 One of the areas where human remains were recovered.

Areni-1 One of the areas where human remains were recovered.

We trudged on slowly towards the rear of the cave, feeling more than seeing our way forward towards an area where the skulls of three sub-adult human skulls were found sealed into large pottery jars. One of the skulls had well preserved brain tissue within. Also around this area, several adult leg and arm bones with evidence of carnivore chewing (probably a dog) were also found. All of the human remains predate the winemaking by several hundred years. Beyond the fact that their heads were severed from their bodies, archaeologists do not know how to interpret these remains. They are being called, “burials,” but it is not clear whether these tweens and teens were sacrificed, or whether they died from natural causes and their heads interred in ritual remembrance. The largest skull has evidence of new bone formation on the inside of the skull, but no evidence of fracture or deliberate penetration into the cranial cavity. This suggests an inflammatory response to an infection as can occur in the encephalidities, meningitis, and osteomyelitis. However, because the adult long bones were chewed by a dog, and some of them were found sealed in pots, I suspect that these kids may have been victims of rabies. We know that rabies was a problem in the Old Babylonian Period of ancient Mesopotamia because they had spells to try to counteract it  Although Areni-1 is much older than the earliest known evidence of rabies in Mesopotamia, It is not too far flung to imagine that these kids died after an infectious bite from a rabid animal.  Whatever the cause of death, my money is on ritual remembrance of these children, not sacrifice or ritual cannibalism as some have suggested.

Tasting Table at the Areni Wine Factory

Tasting Table at the Areni Wine Factory

As we made our way out of the cave, the return of the light felt like emerging from the world of the past represented in the artifacts and assemblages.  I imagined the sounds of people chatting while they worked, animals bleating, some meat cooking on the hearth, and people making and tasting the old Areni-1 vintages.  Imagination is a powerful thing, because not two minutes by Jeep from the base of the cave is the Areni Wine Factory.  Despite its Soviet-sounding name, the wines they make are good and the people who make it are knowledgeable about their wines and wine culture beyond their borders.  That day, they were tasting some mixed fruit wines.  I sampled the grape-cherry and grape pomegranate both of which were very good.  A quick tour of the cellar ended the day and we got back in the Jeep to find some beds for the night.  As we drove, I couldn’t help but reflect upon the coincidence of modern winery so near to the world’s oldest known winery, and wondered how similar (or how different) the people of the Arap Valley are to those who lived in Areni-1.

(Words and photographs by Laura Kelley.  Recording of rabies Incantation borrowed from the London SOAS website).

Share